Sunday, August 16, 2009

Advanced Operators in Linkedin Sourcing !!!!

In my earlier blog I was discussing about Linkedin Sourcing Techniques

Here now it is about Advanced Search operators and the search strings formats

Ok ..Let’s proceed to Advanced Operators........

Here is the page of Linkedin Advanced Search



Advanced Search:

If you want to run an advanced search, click on the “Advanced” link next to the People Search box on the top right hand corner. Find the right person by entering options in the following fields:

•Keyword: Enter any keywords that you are looking for in the member’s profile.

•First Name: Search for a member by first name.

•Last Name: Search for a member by last name.

•Location: Limit your search to members either in a particular area, or willing to travel there.
ZIP code search results show members in the surrounding metro area, not just that ZIP code.

•Title: Search for members with a particular title. If you check “current titles only”, only members who currently hold that title will be returned. If you check “past only”, only members who used to hold that title in a previous position will be returned. Look at the advanced tips below to learn how to use Advanced Operators here.

•Company: Search for members at a particular company. If you check “current companies only”, only members who are currently at that company will be returned. If you check “past only”, only members who used to be at that company will be returned. Look at the advanced tips below to learn how to use Advanced Operators here.

•School: Search for members that are at or went to a particular school or university.

•Industry: Searches for members in one or more primary industries. You can select more than one industry at a time.

•Groups: Searches for members that belong to one or more of your groups.

•Location: Limit your search to members either in a particular area, or willing to travel there.
ZIP code search results show members in the surrounding metro area, not just that ZIP code.

•Interested in: Search for types of members you would like to find: all members, potential employees, consultants/contractors, entrepreneurs, hiring managers, industry experts, or deal-making contacts.

•Joined: Search for members who have joined LinkedIn within a specified period of time. This is perfect for a search that you will be running on a frequent basis, as it displays the more recent additions to LinkedIn who fit the criteria.

Sort by:
•Relationships and recommendations:
•Shows results by degrees away and, within each degree, shows the most-recommended members first

•Relationships:
•Show the people “closest” to you first (your connections are first, then people connected to your connections, then their connections, then people in your groups and so on).

•Relevance:
•If you’ve entered a value in the top keywords field, this will return the member for whom that keyword or keywords are the most relevant.
•Once you’ve returned search results, use the refinement options in the “Modify Your Search” section, and make changes without leaving the page.

Find below Operators names for Linkedin .. This is important .


Let me show you demonstration using Advanced Search operations

Here below

Search String Format for Manager search in Linkedin .
Please have closer look on search string used below...

ccompany:lockheed ctitle:manager country:”united states” zip:20001 radius:25

The result will be

Combining Boolean Operators with LinkedIn’s Advanced Operators

Combine “regular” search terms and Boolean operators along with LinkedIn’s advanced operators. For example, let’s shoot for an Exchange admin/engineer with an MCSE, and a current title of engineer in a 25 mile radius of 94131 in San Francisco:

SourceString for Exchange Administrator
(Important .Please see the OR operator how it is added)

Exchange ctitle:engineer (admin OR administrator OR administration OR administer OR administered OR maintenance OR maintained) (server OR servers) (mail OR email OR messaging) (MCSE OR “Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer”) country:”united states” zip:94131 radius:25

Here is a snippet from one of the results:


LinkedIn’s Advanced Operators in “OR” Statements

Be careful when attempting to use some of LinkedIn’s advanced operators in OR statements.

For example, here are two different ways of trying to search for people with a current title of 1
or more specific titles

Here below the sample for you ...

Exchange (ctitle:engineer OR ctitle:admin OR ctitle:administrator)

That syntax does not run - here is the message you get:
LinkedIn appears to prefer enclosing the OR statements in quotation marks, like this:
exchange ctitle:”engineer OR admin OR administrator

Sorting and Modifying Your Results

After you execute your “hand coded” search using LinkedIn’s advanced operators, you have the option of sorting the results by the usual values and you can also modify your search as you can if you had constructed your search using LinkedIn’s advanced search interface.

Conclusion

If you like being able to “hand code” Boolean search strings, it’s nice to know that we can effectively take advantage of nearly all of LinkedIn’s major search options/parameters (such as current/past company, current/past title, zip code radius, industry, etc.) by combining LinkedIn’s advanced operators with Boolean strings to get precisely the results we are looking for.
Although you can save searches via LinkedIn’s “save this search” feature – if you are using LinkedIn with a free account, you are limited to saving 3 searches. An added benefit of being able to craft complete search strings using LinkedIn’s advanced operators is that you can create your strings in Notepad or Word and save them for future use as well as quickly modify them (copy and paste a search, then change paramaters without having to retype the entire string).

I hope this helps you ….

HAPPY SOURCING !!!!!







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